Publications

This section of the website contains recent news and publications by the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists.

Recent news includes items published to “What's New”.

Media room offers links to popular topics, RSS details, and information for media inquiries.

Influencing B.C. contains links to the ORL's online journal.

News contains press releases and statements from the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists.

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Recent News

A consultant lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the Lobbyist Registration Act (LRA) for failing to file a return within 10 days after entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of his client. An administrative penalty of $500 was imposed.
In June 2016, I was honoured to assume the role of Acting Registrar of Lobbyists. During the first few months of my appointment, I turned my attention to administrative matters. In September, we launched a newly designed website and in October, we introduced several improvements to the Lobbyists Registry. I hope that these enhancements will clarify the registration process for new lobbyists and make registration more transparent for returning registrants.
A consultant lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the Lobbyist Registration Act (LRA) for failing to file a return within 10 days after entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of his client. An administrative penalty of $500 was imposed.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act. The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA and an administrative penalty of $700 was imposed.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act. The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA and an administrative penalty of $500 was imposed.
Find out how to search lobbying activities by public office holder, lobbyist, date range, organization and subject matter.
A quick infographic for lobbyists who register with the Lobbyists Registry.
A flowchart to help determine if you are required to register with the Lobbyists Registry
Am I lobbying if I am only being reimbursed for my expenses? Find out in this advisory bulletin.
“Lobbying is defined, narrowly, as communicating for pay with a public office holder in an attempt to influence a limited number of outcomes.”
Check out this infographic about the five things you should know about lobbying in B.C.
Check out this infographic that provides tips to avoid common misconceptions about registering with the Lobbyists Registry.
How is the 100 hour threshold calculated for in-house lobbyists? Find out in this advisory bulletin.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act (“LRA”). The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA for failing to file a return within 10 days after entering into an undertaking. An administrative penalty of $750 was imposed.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act. The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA and an administrative penalty of $800 was imposed.
In January the ORL partnered with SFU and the Public Affairs Association of Canada to host a conference in Vancouver that focused on the Future of Lobbying. I was very pleased to see such a great turnout.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3( 1) of the LRA for failing to file a return within 1 0 days after entering into an undertaking. An administrative penalty of $500 was imposed.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA for failing to file a return within 10 days after entering into an undertaking. An administrative penalty of $500 was imposed.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA for failing to file a return within 10 days after entering into an undertaking. An administrative penalty of $500 was imposed.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA and an administrative penalty of $700 was imposed. The lobbyist also entered an inaccurate undertaking start date into his return, contrary to s. 4(1) of the LRA, and certified under s. 5(1) of the LRA that the information was true. An administrative penalty was not imposed for this contravention.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA and an administrative penalty of $700 was imposed.
Elizabeth Denham, Registrar of Lobbyists for British Columbia, released the following statement in response to enquiries about Carling Dick concerning her status as a lobbyist for the ride-sharing technology company, Uber.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA and an administrative penalty of $700 was imposed. The lobbyist also entered an inaccurate undertaking start date into his return, contrary to s. 4(1) of the LRA and certified under s. 5(1) of the LRA that the information was true. An administrative penalty was not imposed for this contravention.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act. The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA and an administrative penalty of $700 was imposed.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act. The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA and an administrative penalty of $600 was imposed.
A consultant lobbyist entered into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of her client. The lobbyist filed her return more than 1 0 days after entering into the undertaking contrary to s. 3(1) of the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). Furthermore, the lobbyist entered inaccurate information, the undertaking start date, into her return contrary to s. 4(1 )(b)(ii) of the LRA and certified under s. 5( 1) of the LRA that the information was true. An administrative penalty of $1,700 was imposed.
On January 22, 2014, a consultant lobbyist filed a return, registration ID 18815955, with the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists ("ORL") after entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of his client. On January 21, 2015, the lobbyist changed the undertaking end date of the registration from January 22, 2015 to August 14, 2014. The lobbyist failed to inform the ORL of the termination of his undertaking within 30 days of its end date, contrary to s. 4(3) of the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). An administrative penalty of $500 was imposed. Statutes Considered:
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act. The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of section 3(1) of the LRA and an administrative penalty of $750 was imposed.
In June I released the 2014-15 annual report for the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists (ORL). In the report, we highlight our commitment to public education, which we are working to implement in the coming year. Stay tuned as we continue to make new learning opportunities available.
During an environmental scan, Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists ("ORL") staff discovered a consultant lobbyist who appeared to be lobbying but had not filed a return on the Lobbyists Registry. ORL staff contacted the lobbyist, verified his lobbying activities and discussed the requirements for registration. The consultant lobbyist filed a return with the Lobbyists Registry on May 10, 2015. The lobbyist certified that the commencement date of his undertaking was June 1, 2013. He failed to meet his obligations under s. 3(1) when he did not file a return within 1 0 days of entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of a client. An administrative penalty of $2,000 was imposed.
During an environmental scan, Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists (“ORL”) staff discovered a consultant lobbyist who appeared to be lobbying but had not filed a return on the Lobbyists Registry. ORL staff contacted the lobbyist, verified his lobbying activities and discussed the requirements for registration. The consultant lobbyist filed four returns with the Lobbyists Registry. He failed to meet his obligations under s. 3(1) when he did not file his returns within 10 days of entering into undertakings to lobby on behalf of the clients. An administrative penalty of $3,000 was imposed.
During an environmental scan, Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists (“ORL”) staff discovered a consultant lobbyist who appeared to be lobbying but had not filed a return on the Lobbyists Registry. ORL staff contacted the lobbyist, verified his lobbying activities and discussed the requirements for registration. The consultant lobbyist filed a return with the ORL on May 7, 2015. The lobbyist certified that the commencement date of his undertaking was June 17, 2013. He failed to meet his obligations under s. 3(1) when he did not file a return after entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of a client. An administrative penalty of $3,000 was imposed.
This guide outlines the steps that the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists (“ORL”) takes under the Lobbyists Registration Act (“LRA”) in conducting investigations of apparent non-compliance with the LRA and its regulations.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of s. 3(1) of the LRA and was fined $1,200.
The British Columbia Teachers' Federation ("BCTF") employs an in-house lobbyist. The organization's designated filer failed to file a return within 30 days of the end date of its previous return contrary to s. 3(3)(b) of the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). The designated filer was fined $1,000.
A consultant lobbyist (the "lobbyist") filed a return with the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists ("ORL") on August 13, 2013. The lobbyist certified that the commencement date of his undertaking was July 1, 2013. An investigation by the ORL found that the lobbyist failed to meet his obligations under s. 3( 1) of the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA '? when he did not file a return within 1 0 days of entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of a client. The lobbyist asked the Registrar of Lobbyists (the "Registrar") to reconsider the investigator's findings. Based on new evidence submitted by the lobbyist, the Registrar rescinded the investigator's findings. However, the new evidence prompted the Registrar to initiate an investigation to determine whether the lobbyist had possibly contravened s. 4(1) of the LRA. The Investigator concluded that the lobbyist had contravened s. 3(1) not s. 4(1) of the LRA. The Investigator also discovered additional evidence which showed that the lobbyist had also contravened ss. 4(1 )(b)(iii), 4(1 )(d) and 4(2)(a) of the LRA. The lobbyist was fined $3,500.
Over the past few years we have seen an increased interest in establishing lobbyist registries at the local government level. In this issue our feature story presents the case for the establishment of municipal lobbyist registries in B.C. with the goal of promoting transparency at all levels of government. At this time, Surrey is the only municipality in B.C. to have a municipal lobbyist registry.
Quick tips for designated filers when completing or updating a registration.
Quick tips for consultant lobbyists when completing or updating a registration.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return with the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists ("ORL") on October 29, 2013. The lobbyist certified that the commencement date of the undertaking was September 23, 2013. The contract indicated a start date of September 1, 2013. The return was filed in excess of 1 0 days after the lobbyist entered into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of his client, contrary to s. 3( 1) of the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). Furthermore, the lobbyist entered inaccurate information, the undertaking start date, into his return, contrary to s. 4( 1) of the LRA and certified under s. 5( 1) of the LRA that the information was true. The consultant lobbyist was fined $1,500.
A consultant lobbyist (the lobbyist) filed a return with the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists (ORL) on May 1, 2014. The lobbyist certified that the commencement date of her undertaking was January 1, 2014. She failed to meet her obligations under s. 3(1) when she did not file a return within 1 0 days of entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of a client. The lobbyist was fined $500.
In the Spring 2014 issue of Influencing B.C., I signalled my intention to step up enforcement activity to ensure lobbyists are complying with the Lobbyists Registration Act in the interests of transparency and accountability.
A consultant lobbyist, Brenda Swick, (the lobbyist) filed a return, registration ID 18815957, with the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists (ORL) on January 22, 2014. The lobbyist entered a colleague as another consultant lobbyist engaged by her to work on the undertaking. ORL staff asked the lobbyist to clarify whether her colleague would be submitting a new registration or if this was entered in error. The lobbyist informed the ORL that her colleague was not working on the undertaking and the file was no longer active. ORL staff advised the lobbyist to remove her colleague from the return and terminate the registration. The lobbyist did not comply with s. 4(2)(a) of the Lobbyists Registration Act (LRA) when she failed to remove her colleague from the return prior to the legislated deadline. The lobbyist also failed to terminate the registration within the timelines set out in s. 4(3) of the LRA. The lobbyist was fined $700.
A consultant lobbyist filed a registration to undertake lobbying on behalf of a client organization. Shortly after registration, the lobbyist resigned from his contract with the client organization and accepted other employment. The lobbyist did not update his registration until more than seven months after the time required by the Lobbyists Registration Act. He was found to be in contravention of s. 4(3) of the Lobbyists Registration Act and fined $500.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return with the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists (ORL) on August 8, 2013. The lobbyist certified that the commencement date of his undertaking was June 18, 2013. He failed to meet his obligations under s. 3(1) when he did not file a return within 10 days of entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of a client. The consultant lobbyist was fined $600.
A consultant lobbyist filed a registration to undertake lobbying on behalf of a client. The investigation revealed that the lobbyist failed to meet his obligations under ss. 3(1) and 4(3) of the Lobbyists Registration Act (LRA) when he did not file a return within 10 days of entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of his client and did not update his registration's end-date within 30 days. The lobbyist was assessed a combined administrative monetary penalty of $1,200.
Transparency in lobbying is critical to a well-functioning democracy. As the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development noted in its 2009 report on lobbying, Lobbyists, Government and Public Trust, “Private interests seeking to influence government decisions, legislation or the award of contracts is part of the policy-making process in modern democracies. Lobbying can improve government decisions by providing valuable insights and data, but it can also lead to unfair advantages for vocal vested interests if the process is opaque and standards are lax.”
A consultant lobbyist filed a registration to undertake lobbying on behalf of a client organization. Three months before the end date the lobbyist specified for that undertaking, an organization hired him as an in-house lobbyist and he ceased to lobby on behalf of the client organization. The lobbyist did not update his registration until four months after the actual termination of his undertaking. He was found to be in contravention of s. 4(3) of the Lobbyists Registration Act and fined $500.
An organization employing an in-house lobbyist was required to file a return. The organization's designated filer filed a return within the legislated time frame. There were several outdated target contacts listed in the registration. The Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists ("ORL") registry manager identified the errors, brought the errors to the designated filer's attention and asked him to correct them. The designated filer failed to make the corrections within the time lines set out in the Lobbyists Registration Act ("LRA"). When he did not make the required corrections, the organization's registration was deemed not to have been received by the Registrar. The organization's designated filer thereby failed to file a return as required by s. 3(3)(b) of the LRA within 30 days of its previous return and was fined $1,000.
Cynthia (Burton) Shore, a consultant lobbyist, filed a return with the ORL on June 25, 2013. The lobbyist certified that the commencement date of the undertaking was May 1, 2013. The lobbyist failed to meet her obligations under s. 3(1) when she did not file a return within 10 days after entering into an undertaking to lobby on behalf of a client. The consultant lobbyist was fined $700.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client two months after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act. The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of s. 3(1) of the Lobbyists Registration Act and fined $700.
A consultant lobbyist filed a return to register as a lobbyist on behalf of a client one year after the deadline required by the Lobbyists Registration Act. The lobbyist was found to be in contravention of the Lobbyists Registration Act and fined $700.
Building on the work outlined in Lobbying in British Columbia: The Way Forward, this report summarizes the results of an extensive consultation undertaken by the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists (“ORL”) on the status of lobbying regulation in British Columbia and recommends five amendments to the Lobbyists Registration Act (“LRA”).
Autumn is, for many, a time to reflect on the year that’s been and look forward to the coming year and its new opportunities. Looking back on 2013, our most significant accomplishment was a comprehensive proposal to amend the legislation regulating lobbying in B.C. After more than six months of consultations with lobbyists, public office holders and key stakeholders, I tabled a report in the Legislature recommending five critical amendments to the Lobbyists Registration Act (LRA).
Since we published our last issue, in addition to our regular business, we’ve been busy moving our legislative reform project forward. I was appointed as the Registrar of Lobbyists for B.C. just after the 2010 amendments to the Lobbyists Registration Act (LRA) were passed. These last three years have been a time of learning for my office and for members of the B.C. lobbying community.
The Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists conducted an investigation to determine whether the British Columbia Association of Chiefs of Police and the British Columbia Association of Municipal Chiefs of Police were required to register under the LRA. The Acting Deputy Registrar found that the police associations are not required to register as lobbyists under the LRA, because their members communicate with public office holders in their official capacity as employees of a local government authority or the government of Canada and are exempt from the requirement to register.
A consultant lobbyist filed a registration, which was allowed to lapse when it expired. Nearly six months later, the same consultant lobbyist filed a new registration, which comprised the same undertaking to lobby for the same client as the registration that had been allowed to lapse. The consultant lobbyist admits that he had lobbied during the period during which his registration had lapsed, and was found to have contravened section 4(2)(a) of the LRA. He was fined $506.
Lobbyists are a natural part of the democratic landscape. And yet, lobbying is largely misunderstood by the public, and often mischaracterised. Lobbyists come from all walks of life. They are employees and contractors of non-profit associations seeking additional funding for out-of-school care, local businesses seeking changes in law enforcement policies, multinational corporations seeking to increase investment opportunities, chambers of commerce seeking business tax exemptions and environmental groups seeking to protect indigenous species of plants. They are employees and contractors of any organization seeking to influence public policy decisions.
Registrar of Lobbyists Elizabeth Denham has recommended changes to B.C.'s lobbying rules, including a two-year ban on lobbying by all former high ranking public officials, in a report tabled today in the Legislative Assembly.
Happy 2013! It’s hard to believe another year has come and gone already. Last year was another busy year for the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists.
It is an “old saw” among lobby regulators, and something of an understatement, that achieving compliance with lobby regulation is notoriously difficult.
As forecasted in the May, 2011 edition of Influencing BC, I invite all readers to participate in a public consultation that my office is facilitating on the issue of whether a BC lobbyist code of conduct is warranted and, if so, what it should contain.
The purpose of this paper is to stimulate thought and discussion amongst stakeholder groups and the general public about whether British Columbia should have a lobbyist code of conduct, and, if so, what effects it might have, and how such a code might best be enforced. We invite members of the public and interested stakeholders to participate in this consultation by reading this paper and responding to the questions contained therein and/or providing relevant feedback concerning a lobbyist code of conduct.
The Lobbyist admitted to registering lobbying activity on behalf of a client that was not taking place. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention of supplying inaccurate information to the Registrar of Lobbyists to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to registering lobbying activity on behalf of a client that was not taking place. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention of supplying inaccurate information to the Registrar of Lobbyists to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to registering lobbying activity on behalf of a client that was not taking place. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention of supplying inaccurate information to the Registrar of Lobbyists to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to registering lobbying activity on behalf of a client that was not taking place. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention of supplying inaccurate information to the Registrar of Lobbyists to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to registering lobbying activity on behalf of a client that was not taking place. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention of supplying inaccurate information to the Registrar of Lobbyists to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist was retained by Equifax as a consultant lobbyist and the information he supplied to the Registrar of Lobbyists in registering this lobbying activity was not inaccurate.
The Lobbyist admitted to registering lobbying activity on behalf of a client that was not taking place. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention of supplying inaccurate information to the Registrar of Lobbyists to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to registering lobbying activity on behalf of a client that was not taking place. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention of supplying inaccurate information to the Registrar of Lobbyists to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to terminating the registration for the lobbying activity after the 30-day requirement of s. 4(3) of the LRA. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to terminating the registration for the lobbying activity after the 30-day requirement of s. 4(3) of the LRA. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to terminating the registration for the lobbying activity after the 30-day requirement of s. 4(3) of the LRA. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to terminating the registration for the lobbying activity after the 30-day requirement of s. 4(3) of the LRA. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to terminating the registration for the lobbying activity after the 30-day requirement of s. 4(3) of the LRA. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
The Lobbyist admitted to terminating the registration for the lobbying activity after the 30-day requirement of s. 4(3) of the LRA. The Acting Deputy Registrar found the alleged contravention to be substantiated and issued a monetary penalty of $25.
Happy 2012! Welcome to our 1st anniversary issue of Influencing BC. 2011 was a very busy and productive year for the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists, culminating in a December conference cohosted with Simon Fraser University’s Institute of Governance Studies (IGS).
The ratio of available enforcement resources of the ORL to the registered lobbyist community is roughly 850 to 1. This gap underscores the importance of a multi-pronged compliance strategy and one that supports and promotes critical dialogue.
Over a year ago sweeping amendments to the BC Lobbyists Registration Act (―LRA‖) came into force. Since then, the number of registered lobbyists in BC has doubled. This law is all about transparency. It attempts to enhance public trust in government decision-making processes by making lobbying activities transparent. Declarations by lobbyists about their activities are placed in an easily accessible online registry. The LRA fulfills the public’s right to know who is attempting to influence government decisions by requiring lobbyists to publicly register, declare who they are lobbying, on whose behalf, on what subject matter and why.
I have a confession to make. I have been lobbied. As a former ―designated public office holder‖ under the federal system, I learned firsthand that lobbyists come in all shapes and sizes, contrary to inaccurate but enduring perceptions that lobbyists are shady backroom players. The fact is that we live amongst lobbyists.