As of May 1, 2018, former public office holders must not lobby for a period of two years from the date they last held the position. 

Former public office holders may request an exemption from the Registrar of Lobbyists if the lobbying activity is considered to be in the public interest.

The Registrar evaluates each exemption application, and issues a binding decision. 

 

Year
Date Number Lobbyist Summary
Sep 05, 2018 ED 18-06 Mark Blucher (Central 1 Credit Union) The applicant served as president and chief executive officer of the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) for five years and senior vice president of insurance for the previous two years. On January 22, 2018, he became president and chief executive officer of Central 1 Credit Union (Central 1). The Registrar concluded it was not in the public interest to exempt the applicant from the two-year cooling-off period under s. 2.2 of the Lobbyists Registration Act (LRA).
Jul 31, 2018 ED 18-05 Brynn Bourke (BC Building Trades) The applicant is an in-house lobbyist with the BC Building Trades. She served for 6.5 weeks as a ministerial assistant in the office of one minister during the transition from the previous provincial government to the present administration. Her application for an exemption from the two-year lobbying prohibition that applies under section 2.2 of the LRA does not properly arise for decision. This is because she clearly does not fall within the plain and unambiguous language of the LRA’s definition of “former public office holder.” She is therefore not subject to the s. 2.2 cooling-off period in the first place. The Legislature may have intended to cover individuals in the applicant’s position, but enacted language that does not do so.
Jul 31, 2018 ED 18-04 Matthew Holme (Tourism Victoria) For almost a decade the applicant served as an executive assistant, ministerial assistant and chief of staff for several provincial government ministers. He was chief of staff to the former minister of tourism from December 2013 to July 2017. He is now an in-house lobbyist for Tourism Victoria, a notfor- profit organization. The applicant argued that, because of the 2017 change in government, he does not have relationships with ministers or their staff, thus addressing concern his being able to exploit relationships. He also argued that he does not possess information that could be used to lobby for Tourism Victoria. Given the length, seniority and recent nature of the applicant’s government experience, as a senior political staffer across several ministries, including tourism, it is not in the public interest to exempt him from the two-year cooling-off period under section 2.3.
Jul 31, 2018 ED 18-03 Martyn Lafrance The applicant served as chief of staff to two ministers. It is not in the public interest to exempt him from the two-year cooling-off period under s. 2.2 of the Lobbyists Registration Act. The nature and length of his work, and other factors, do not support his request.
Jul 31, 2018 ED 18-02 Alex Shiff (Navigator Ltd.) The applicant worked for 17 months as an executive assistant in a minister’s office. His application for an exemption from the two-year cooling-off period under s. 2.2 of the Lobbyists Registration Act is denied, as the requested exemption is not in the public interest. The legislative intention of s. 2.3 is to address the fact that a “former public office holder” may use recent information or relationships acquired in government to lobby after leaving government. The nature and length of the applicant’s tenure in government are relevant, and there are no other factors supporting the conclusion that it would be in the public interest to grant the exemption.
Jul 31, 2018 ED 18-01 Lindsay Kislock (Mining Association of British Columbia) The applicant, a former long-time assistant deputy minister in the provincial government, is subject to a two-year lobbying prohibition under section 2.2 of the Lobbyists Registration Act. Her application for an exemption under s. 2.3 is denied as it is not in the public interest. The authority to waive the exemption and impose conditions can only be exercised when it is in the public interest to do so. The legislative intention of s. 2.3 is to ensure that the narrow class of former public office holders, who, by definition, have worked at or very close to the heart of executive government, cannot use inside information or relationships to lobby immediately after leaving government. The authority to impose exemption conditions does not undercut the need for such an application to reach the public interest threshold. An exemption is not in the public interest in this case.